running of the bulls

The Trick Is To Stay Ahead Of The Bulls

“Entering its seventh year, the ageing US equity bull market looks vulnerable (alt)…Uncertainty over how asset prices will react once borrowing costs rise for the first time since 2006, looms large over Wall Street.”  People are pretty worried about the rising dollar, buybacks fueling the bull, lower energy earnings, etc.  All that being said, a “modest tightening from the Fed [may] sustain the appeal of owning equities even with the S&P trading at 17 times future earnings.”  Meanwhile, it’s been four days since the ECB began purchasing bonds and guess what?  The ECB’s QE Is Working Well!  “The ECB has finally broken the QE taboo and has become a normal central bank…The lack of contagion from the recent Greek turmoil is a good example of this confidence effect.  Euro area bonds have again become risk-free assets, hopefully putting to rest the mistaken view that euro area countries ‘don’t have a central bank’…Quantitative easing has erased most of the near term deflationary risks and has restored the ECB’s long-term price stability credibility…and markets are now moving in the right direction.”  Meanwhile, the grass is greener in currency hedged European equity ETF funds: “These funds have become multibillion-dollar blockbusters because of alpha seekers.  But they could be in for a surprise once the trend ends or even if the movement goes into hibernation for a while as the foreign exchange market consolidates.  The takeaway is this: It’s probably fair to expect parity between the euro and the dollar.  But once parity is reached, it might make sense to think through this currency-hedging decision again and carefully.”  Meanwhile, Ray Dalio explains the power of not knowing: “You can’t make money agreeing with the consensus view, which is already embedded in the price.  Yet whenever you’re betting against the consensus, there’s a significant probability you’re going to be wrong, so you have to be humble…We all make better decisions by maintaining an independent view and the conflicting possibilities in our minds simultaneously, and then trying to resolve the differences.  We’re always in the place of holding an opinion and simultaneously stress-testing the hell out of it.”

 

Homeownership By Age

Michelle Meyer, an economist at Merrill Lynch, has some numbers on homeownership rates by age: “The biggest decline in the past ten years has been among the 30-34 year olds, followed closely by the 35-44 year old cohort….There was a similar story for the 25-29 year olds, but not quite as extreme.  In contrast, the homeownership rate for 65+ has been little changed.”  Meanwhile, “the National Association of Realtors said millennials, or those between 18 and 34 years old, accounted for the largest share of home buyers last year at 32%…The median age of millennial homebuyers was 29, their median income was $76,900 and they typically bought a 1,720-square foot home costing $189,900.”

 

What’s Oil Doing?

UBS economists say that “if oil prices were to remain close to current levels over the remainder of 2015, it would be unusual.  There have only been 8 occasions in the last 150 years, for example, when the cumulative 2-year change in oil prices has been more than 50%, which is what it would be if oil prices remained close to $60/bbl from here.  Putting that another way, there is at present a 25% chance that oil prices climb to $80 or higher by the end of 2015 based on the pure statistical properties of oil price swings in the past as well as relative to what is discounted in the forward curve.”  Meanwhile, some large oil companies may enjoy trading the fruits of production more than others: “In the first quarter of 2009 (the last bear market for oil), BP said it made $500 million above its normal level of profits from trading.  That means that trading accounted for, at the very least, 20 percent of BP’s adjusted income of $2.38 billion that quarter…oil trading could provide BP, Shell and Total with an edge over U.S. rivals Exxon Mobil Corp. and Chevron Corp., which sell their own production, but largely eschew pure trading as a means of generating profits…Although extra profits from trading won’t offset the much larger loss of revenue from lower oil prices, it could help the three companies to weather the crisis and, perhaps more importantly, beat analysts’ estimates.”

 

AAPL: Apple’s Moat: Mall Rats Edition

 

What: Mountain View Resident Suspects He May Live To See 500

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