Aloe

Data Dependency Feels Bad, And Then It Feels Good, And Then It Feels Bad, And…

“This week’s sell off might have been because too many investors believed bond yields would only go down; crowded positioning left the market vulnerable to small shifts in sentiment.”  Interesting to consider that “when fears about a eurozone break-up rise, German yields generally fall;” therefore, higher yields = less worry about Greece?  Maybe not: “right now (read: Thursday) the market is in a state of shock…A lot of people are staying clear, and that makes the market less liquid, which is helping to exaggerate market moves…the moves have reversed so sharply that [European yields] are back where they were before the stimulus was announced…’In one week we had a total unwinding of all QE-related trades.’”  Speaking of liquidity, Mohamed El-Erian says “tighter regulations and less patient shareholders have restricted the ability of broker-dealers to deploy their balance sheets counter-cyclically.  As such, they have limited appetite when it comes to accumulating inventory in the event that a large chunk of the investor base decides to go the other way.  The result has been a series of sudden out-sized price moves in quite a range of markets, from sovereign bonds to foreign exchange, emerging markets, and high-yield corporates.”  So as you can probably tell, things got a bit panicky this week; we even had a moment with Janet Yellen calling stocks overvalued and prices stretched and all that (very déjà vu).  To be fair, the panic was coming from bond markets, which have this strange ability to convince people of more things than the stock market.  But all of that is going away fast: the April jobs report came out this morning and investors are all like, “oohh…reassuring.”  🙂  “Payrolls rose 223,000 in April, following a 85,000 gain in March…The unemployment rate slid further to 5.4 per cent…more Americans entered the labour force, pushing up the participation rate to 62.8 per cent from 62.7 per cent the previous month.”  “The standard story that economists have been telling is that this is just another messy winter with worse-than-usual weather…But there’s a ‘show me’ dimension to that conclusion…So what the new jobs numbers offer is relief that the crummy first-quarter data was indeed an aberration, not a new trend.  At the same time, they are soft enough that they include no real evidence of an acceleration into a new, stepped-up rate of growth” (read: acceleration into Fed tightening).  Here are the charts.  Also, German bund yields have dropped back down to 0.53bps, and you shouldn’t feel bad if you missed out on the Gross Short of a Lifetime because apparently Bill Gross missed it as well.

 

China: Pinky Swears No QE

 

WM: Risk ≠ Volatility, Maybe

 

WM: Case For Indexing In Bonds Is Far Less Clear Than It Is For Stocks

 

What: The “Cylon Detection” System Finds 10 To 20 Spoofers A Day, On Average

 

WaitWhat: You Know That All Startup Founders Dropped Out Of College And Hate English, Right?

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